Lead Residents

Larry Achiampong & David Blandy

 

David Blandy & Larry Achiampong led PRAKSIS's inaugural residency, "New Technology And The Post-Human," in March - April, 2016. Through their work, Blandy and Achiampong examine ideas of communal and personal heritage, using performance to investigate cultural hierarchies and the “fiction of the self”.

Blandy and Achiampong have exhibited extensively in the UK and internationally, both individually and as a duo, at venues including Tate, London; Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai; and MOMA PS1, New York. Their 2014-15 hip-hop-inspired collaboration Biters was funded by the Arts Council of England and is “unique, in that it unifies both appropriation as a methodology and “biting” [the stealing of taggers’ or hip-hop artists’ personal styles] as an existential state”, critic Morgan Quaintance has written. “Biters…is a project about attraction and repulsion, and in hip-hop Achiampong and Blandy have recognised a musical genre pulsating with all the contradictory energies of hierarchical value systems, based on race, privilege and subjection”.

 


David Blandy and Larry Achiampong, Finding Fanon 2, 2015
Commissioned by Brighton Digital Festival 2015, supported by Arts Council England. Finding Fanon 2 is made using the Grand Theft Auto 5 in-game video editor. The Finding Fanon series is inspired by the lost plays of Frantz Fanon, (1925-1961) a politically radical humanist whose practice dealt with the psychopathology of colonisation and the social and cultural consequences of decolonisation.

 
 

Jeremy Bailey

Self-styled “Famous New Media Artist” Jeremy Bailey’s inventive and endearingly self-deflating performance practice collides the vulnerabilites and embarrassments of physical embodiment with the tricks of internet marketing and digital imaging’s sleek pictographics. His work has featured in an international roster of venues and festivals, including the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Liverpool; Whitechapel Gallery, London; Transmediale, Berlin; Museums Quartier, Vienna; and the New Museum, New York. Via his project The You Museum (2015-ongoing), Bailey’s displays – individually tailored to suit the viewer’s personal tastes – can be accessed globally online: see here.

 

 

Jeremy Bailey, The Future of Television, 2012.
Software demo created for Random Acts: Artist Interventions into Broadcast 26 October 2012 - http://liverpoolbiennial.co.uk/programmes/festivals/whatson/0/4/2012/459/random-acts-artist-interventions-into-broadcast/ Commissioned by Omar Kholeif for FACT, Liverpool and Liverpool Biennial in partnership with Channel 4 and Arts Council England Thanks to Kyle McDonald for developing Face OSC

RELATED //

Robert Bordo

 
 

Robert Bordo makes thematic paintings that integrate a notion of formalism with a range of personal and theoretical narratives. Since the mid-1980s, his work has been exhibited extensively and internationally in solo and group exhibitions. Highlights include shows at the National Exemplar Gallery, Bortolami Gallery, Alexander and Bonin Gallery, MoMA PS1 and the Brooklyn Museum (all New York); The Suburban, Oak Park, IL, Mummery + Schnelle, London, the Museum fur Gegenwartskunst, Basel, and Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Collections in which his work features include the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles and the Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, NE. Awards and fellowships he has received include the 2014 Robert de Niro Sr. Painting Prize, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, Canada Council Arts Grant, the Tesuque Foundation Arts Fellowship Award, a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, Ballinglen Fellowship, a Hermitage Retreat Fellowship and a Painting Fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts. He has designed sets, costumes and posters for the Mark Morris Dance Company, including designs for Brooklyn Academy of Music’s 2017 revival of Dido and Aeneas. As Associate Professor of Art he led the Cooper Union’s painting program from 1996 until 2017. He lives and works in Columbia County and Brooklyn, NY.

Phoebe Davies

 

Selected extracts from A Navigation by Phoebe Davies and Nandi Bhebhe, 2017. [Please listen with headphones/speakers, as audio is sensitive]

 

Phoebe Davies is a Welsh artist and researcher, presently based at Somerset House Studios in London. Her practice investigates people’s perceptions of their social framing, and she frequently uses collaboration, collective action and Do It Together strategies to make work with individuals, groups and communities.

Through her work Davies often finds herself referencing and exploring collaborative models of working across different social and cultural sectors. Recently, she has investigated ideas taken from areas as disparate as basketball, feminist organisation, science fiction and methods of organic farming.

Recent projects have led  her to work with sex educators, secondary school students, elderly residents in care homes, sports teams and DJs as well as art spaces and institutions, including Tate Britain and Tate Modern (London), Whitechapel Gallery (London), Arnolfini (Bristol), Fierce Festival (Birmingham), South London Gallery (London), Wysing Arts Centre (London), Steirischer Herbst (Graz, AUT), Assembly (Portland, USA) and SA-UK SEASONS 2015 (Johannesburg, ZA).

The final forms of Davies’s work are project dependent, and have included live performances, video, audio, print works and constructed social spaces. She currently co-facilitates three research groups: Bedfellows, a radical sex re-education research project; Synaptic Island, a London-based womxn and non-binary DJ collective; and Art is Action, a UK-based social practice research group. In 2015 she was awarded the British Council’s Social Practice Fellowship for the International Cultural Exchange U.S.Program, and she is currently supported by Syllabus III, an UK-wide alternative peer-led learning programme for artists.
 

Smadar Dreyfus

 

 

Smadar Dreyfus’s projects excavate scenes of everyday life for reverberations of a wider socio-political context. Focusing in particular on the role of the voice in the enactment of contested public spaces, she uses documentary recordings gathered over long periods of research. Her video and sound installations consist of specific architectural enclosures, designed to immerse viewer-listeners in affective soundscapes, raising questions about communication and translation across cultural and political divides. Writing on the installation Mother’s Day at Extra City, Antwerp, Doreen Mende has observed how Dreyfus“modestly yet decisively conveys a vivid sense of how politics and the burden of history affect the lives of individuals in our present-day realities”.

Dreyfus’s selected solo exhibitions include: Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin 2014, Magasin III, Stockholm 2009, Extra City, Antwerpen 2008, IKON Birmingham 2005 and Victoria Miro, London 2006. Selected group exhibitions include the 2011 Folkestone Triennial, S.M.A.K. Gent 2010, Mediations Biennial, Poznan 2010, ArTLV Biennale, Tel Aviv 2009, MUSAC Leon, Spain 2006, and the 9th Istanbul Biennial, 2005.

 

Elvira Dyangani Ose

 

Elvira Dyangani Ose is Director of The Showroom, London. She is currently affiliated to the Department of Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths and the Thought Council at the Fondazione Prada. Until November 2018, she will serve as Creative Time Senior Curator. Recently she was part of the curatorial team of the Biennale de l'Image en Mouvement 2016, and was curator of the eighth edition of the Göteborg International Biennial for Contemporary Art, GIBCA 2015. Previously, Dyangani Ose served as Curator International Art at Tate Modern (2011 – 2014), Curator at the Centro Atlántico de Arte Moderno and the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo, as Artistic Director of Rencontres Picha, Lubumbashi Biennial (2013), and as Guest Curator of the triennial SUD, Salon Urbain de Douala (2010). Dyangani Ose has published and lectured on modern and contemporary African art and has contributed to art journals such as Nka and Atlántica.

Seamus Harahan

 
 

Seamus Harahan was invited by PRAKSIS in collaboration with Oslo Pilot, and selected the theme of mucker mate around which to form a residency. Harahan's deceptively simple work engages with his surrounding environment, discovering a sensual poetics in everyday, marginal and overlooked subjects and peripheral details. his work was described by Adrian Wootton, Chief Executive of Film London and the British Film Commission, as: “challenging and experimental while also humorous and accessible.”

Harahan is represented in London by Gimpel Fils and has exhibited widely internationally, including at Tate Britain, London, and representing Northern Ireland at the 51st Venice Biennale in 2005. He received a Paul Hamlyn Foundation Award for Artists in 2009, and won the 2015 Jarman Award. He is ex-director of Catalyst Arts Belfast. Harahan lives and works in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

 

Seamus Harahan, Stay here a while, 2008

 

RESIDENCY // 

mucker mate

RELATED // 

 

Robert Holyhead

 
 

Robert Holyhead studied Fine Art at Manchester School of Art, Manchester Metropolitan University, between 1993 and 96, and at the Chelsea School of Art and Design between 1996 and 97. Solo exhibitions include shows at Galerie Max Hetzler, Paris, in 2016; PARTS Project, The Hague, in 2016; Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, in 2014; PEER, London, in 2012; and Karsten Schubert, London, in 2009, 2010 and 2012. He was a recipient of the five-year ACME Fire Station live/work residency (2005) and in 2009/10 he was commissioned by the Government Art Collection to produce two site-specific works for the new British Embassy in Brussels. In July 2018, he completed a residency at SoART in Austria. He is represented by Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin and Paris. In 2018, he was selected for one of the Art Foundation’s 20th Anniversary awards. Public collections holding his work include the UK Arts Council Collection, the UK Government Art Collection, Tate and the Centre Georges Pompidou. Recent writing projects include What is Seen: a catalogue essay published by Tate for Patrick Heron’s retrospective at Tate St Ives.

International Collaborative Drawing Project (ICDP)

 


International Collaborative Drawing Project (ICDP) is a global participatory initiative which uses drawing as a starting point for cooperative creation. Founded in London in 2010 by artist Ivan Liotchev, the project works with diverse cultural organisations and communities to develop drawing events, exhibitions, public art, and multi-media spectacles that explore drawing within a wide context.

ICDP has developed projects throughout the UK, Europe and USA, with communities ranging from Hopi and Acoma Native American pueblos in the American Southwest to underpriviledged youths in London and Wakefield, England. Recent projects include: London Brain Project, London (2016); COLLABORATE!, Glyndwr University/Focus Wales, Wrexham, UK (2015); The Kingswood Draw, produced by Emergency Exit Arts for Southwark Council, London (2014); Right Up Our Street, DARTS, Doncaster (2014); Light Up Lancaster, (2013); A Million Minutes, produced by AIR @ Central Saint Martins for Islington Council, London (2012). Ongoing work with The Guinness Partnership facilitates opportunities for social housing residents to create their own public art across the UK.

 

RESIDENCY //


In time, we too will become ancestors...

LINKS //

www.icdpdraw.com/

 

Gereon Krebber

 
 

Sculptor Gereon Krebber studied at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and the Royal College of Art, London, and has exhibited extensively since the early 2000s. His work has featured in solo and group shows in Los Angeles, New York, Berlin, Cologne, Dusseldorf, London and elsewhere, and he has received commissions to develop public work in Bonn, Bochum and Viersen (DE). Awards received include the UK’s Jerwood Sculpture Prize (2003) and the Wilhelm-Lehmbruck-Stipendium (Duisburg, 2009). His working processes probe questions about sculpture as a discipline in relation to site, time, language, communication and the body, and extend across a highly experimental range of media, including writing and speech: for example, via the Laberflash, a new form of performance that he has developed, in which participants’ bodies, voices and thinking processes become unexpected new media for sculptural experimentation.

Benjamin Lignel

Gender and adornment research, documentation archive from San Francisco field trip, November 2016, photo: Lignel / Wiggers. This research was supported by a Craft Research Fund grant from The Center for Craft, Creativity & Design, Inc., which was administered by Art Jewelry Forum.
 

Benjamin Lignel is an artist, writer and curator. He was the editor of Art Jewelry Forum between January 2013 and December 2016, and edited three books under AJF’s imprint, including the first book-length study of jewelry exhibition-making. His most recent curatorial project was Medusa, Jewellery and Taboos (2017) at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, in collaboration with Anne Dressen and Michèle Heuzé. Benjamin has lectured extensively on craft, and likes to organize (or co-organize) symposia on jewellery, of which The Public and Private Lives of Jewellery (Zimmerhof, 2011), Forgetting Jewellery (Paris, 2017) and The Fuzzy, the Fake and the Double - Trouble in Ornament (Paris, 2017). He is a guest teacher at the Akademie der Bildende Künste (Nürnberg) and at Alchimia (Florence), and a mentor in the Handshake 4 pedagogical program (New Zealand). Ben regularly contributes essays to magazines, monographs and museum publications, and is currently working with co-editor Namita Wiggers towards a series of publications on jewelry and gender. He lives in Montreuil (France).

Natasha Marie Llorens



Natasha Marie Llorens is an independent curator and writer based in Marseille and New York. Recent curatorial projects include “We the Watchers are Also Bodies,” at Hercules Art Studio Program in Manhattan, "The Exposed Suture" in Marseille, and "Mine are True Love Stories...." at the Skowhegan offices in New York. Llorens has held curatorial residencies at Marra Tein in Beirut and at Triangle Arts Association in New York, and is currently the 2017 Entrée Principale curatorial resident at Rond Point Projects in Marseille, France. Her writing has appeared in ArtReview, Modern Painters, BOMB Magazine, Pastelegram, WdW Review, Contemporary Art Stavanger, Ibraaz, and elsewhere. Institutions taught at include Columbia University and the Cooper Union in New York City, and the Curatorial Studies MA program at Parsons in Paris. She is currently developing a PhD at Columbia University, focused on the representation of war in Algerian national cinema between 1965 and 1979.  

 

Images:
  • Kerry Downey at "In This Hello America" as part of Action Club's collaboration with Douglas Paulson, April 2011, Double Session, a thesis exhibition for the Center of Curatorial Studies at Bard College curated by N. M. Llorens. Photo: Douglas Paulson.
  • Natasha Marie Llorens photographed by Natalie Hope O'Donnell.

Eliza Naranjo Morse

 

Based in Northern New Mexico, USA, Eliza Naranjo Morse works across disciplines from sculpture and drawing to social projects involving cultivating land and working in public schools and the local youth detention center.  Through her interdisciplinary work she seeks to celebrate place, and to consider the intangibles of life including spirituality, balance, resourcefulness and renewal. 

Eliza Naranjo Morse studied drawing at Parsons School of Design and at the Institute for American Indian Arts, and ultimately graduated from Skidmore College with a B.S. in art in 2003. Naranjo Morse has shown her work in a number of international venues including, among others, at Cumbre de el Tajin, Veracruz, Mexico; Ekaterinburg Museum of Fine Arts, Ekaterinburg, Russia; Chelsea Art Museum, New York, New York; SITE Santa Fe, Santa Fe, New Mexico; Axle Contemporary, Santa Fe, NM, USA; Heard Museum, Phoenix, AZ, USA; Berlin Gallery Phoenix; School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe. A participating artist of the Site Santa Fe Biennial in 2008 she is also a 2007 awardee of the King Artist Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe.

 

Iz Öztat

Images left to right:
Constituting an Island, Iz Oztat, 2014, Video still from single channel HD video, 1' 46'' Loop
Will Flow Free / Who Carries The Water, Iz Oztat and Fatma Belkis, 2015, Wood-printed naturally-dyed muslin, Dedicated to the public domain
Who Carries The Water, Iz Oztat and Fatma Belkis, 2015, A page from the 19-page text, reproduced by mimeograph, Copyleft


Iz Öztat is an artist based in Istanbul. She is a member of BAÇOY-KOOP (Printing, Duplication and Distribution Cooperative), a group that utilizes the mimeograph technology for collective, independent publishing in Turkey’s current climate of repression. The cooperative conducts archival research into mimeographed printed material and dialogues with the technology’s previous generation of users – investigations that lead to collectively-produced printed matter, actions and installations. She is a collaborator in HTTPpRESS, an online platform that publishes content with free/libre licences or notices. With Fatma Belkıs, she explores the convergence of water and freedom, and she communes with the shade of Zişan (1894 – 1970) who appears to her as a historical figure, a channeled spirit and an alter ego. She has taught at Oberlin College (USA) as a Visiting Professor.

Selected exhibitions include Tamawuj, Sharjah Biennial 13, United Arab Emirates (2017); Land without Land, Heidelberger Kunstverein, Germany (2016); Saltwater: A Theory of Thought Forms, 14th Istanbul Biennial (2015); Conducted in Depth and Projected at Length, Heidelberger Kunstverein, Germany (2014); Rendez-vous 13, Institut d’art Contemporain, Lyon, France (2013); and Here Together Now, Matadero Madrid, Spain (2013).

Lindsay Seers


Lindsay Seers works in London and lives on the Isle of Sheppey. She studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, University College London and at Goldsmiths College, University of London, where she now works as a lecturer on MA Fine Art. Her works are in a number of collections including Tate collection, Arts Council collection, Artangel collection and the collection of MONA, Tasmania. She has won several prestigious grants and awards such as the Sharjah Art Foundation Production Award, UAE; Le Jeu de Paume production award for the Toulouse Festival, France; the Paul Hamlyn Award; the Derek Jarman Award; AHRC Award; a number of Arts Council and British Council Awards in support of her works and she also received the Wingate Scholarship from The British School at Rome 2007/8. She has shown her large scale works internationally at a number of museums and art centres including SMK (National Gallery of Denmark); Venice Biennale 2015; Hayward Gallery, UK; MONA, Tasmania; Bonniers Konsthall, Sweden; Smart Project Space, Amsterdam; Kiasma, Finland; Turner Contemporary, UK; Tate Triennial, UK, TPW, Canada, Sami Centre for Art; Norway; Centre for Contemporary Art 'Poland and Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art. Recent new commissions include Suffering, Unconformity Festival 2016, Queenstown, Australia; Nowhere Less Now, Glynn Vivian Gallery, Wales 2016; Nowhere Less Now 5, Turner Contemporary UK, 2016.

 

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